Shariq Ali Sam Flanery Celeste Novak
Huda Alkaff Patty Gillis Kerrin O'Brien
Michele Arquette-Palermo Stefan Graf Anthony Offak
John Barrie Dick Green  Michael Paciero
Steve Bell Fay Hansen Lauren Pedigo
Alexis Blizman Lynn Henning Jessica Simons
Bob Chapman David Konkle Raman Singh
Mark Clevey Brett Little Sridar Sivaraman
Jacob Corvidae Gwen Meyer Nathan Vader

Shariq Ali

Shariq Ali, PE, LEED AP BD+C, CGDIT

Mechanical Engineer, Westlake Reed Leskosky
BIO: Mr. Ali is a mechanical engineer at Westlake Reed Leskosky. The focus of his design work is on sustainable buildings in the areas of healthcare, education, arts and culture. Mr. Ali is a graduate of the University of Michigan – Dearborn (BSME), and currently enrolled in the MSE program at Case Western Reserve University.
SESSION 1B: Sustainable Design within the Commercial Building Process
I will be presenting on the use of energy conservation measures (ECMs) for new buildings. My presentation will include: 1. A discussion on the design and construction process 2. Where ECMs are designed into design and construction process 3. Where sustainability enthusiast can impact design within the design and construction process 4. ECM strategies for ASHRAE climate zone 5a (which Detroit is a part of) 5. Best practices and lessons learned for daylight harvesting, geo-exchange systems (geothermal), and others 6. Practical application of commercial systems to the residential market The overarching tone of the presentation will include how values of an organization affects the design and sustainable practices that are implemented. Examples will be given from my projects with non-profits, religious organizations, corporations and others. The objective of the presentation will be to familiarize people of technical and non-technical backgrounds with the building industry, ECMS, how ECMs are implemented, how these measures can be used at home, and how to engage in the architecture, engineering and design process to help facilitate the construction of a more sustainable built environment.
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Huda Alkaff

President, Wisconsin IPL & Director, Islamic Environ-mental Group of Wisconsin
BIO: Huda Alkaff founded the Islamic Environmental Group of Wisconsin in 2005. IEGW promotes knowledge about Islamic environmental teachings, how to apply these teachings in daily life and to how collabo-rate with others toward a just, peaceful and sustainable future. Huda holds degrees in conservation ecology and sustainable development, as well as science and envi-ronmental education, and she has taught environmental science courses at the University of Wisconsin.
SESSION 4A: Ecology & Theology
In this panel, faith leaders from diverse traditions discuss how their faiths conceptualize the environment and issues of sustainability. Featuring panelists from the Sikh, Hindu and Islamic religions, the discussion offers perspectives that differ from the conventional, secular view of humans as masters of creation, emphasizing instead the interconnectedness and interdepend-ency of all living things (humans, animals and plants). This panel reminds us that the common ground we occupy in our shared desire to care for creation can also be a foundation for build-ing unity across faith groups.
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Michele Arquette-Palermo

Program Director, Clinton River Watershed Council
BIO: Michele assists communities in their public education initiatives for storm water management as well as designs and implements environmental education professional development for teachers. Michele is a former President of the Michigan Alliance for Environmental and Outdoor Education and Co-chair of the Michigan No Child Left Inside Coalition. Michele was awarded the Michigan Water Environment Association Educational Professional of the Year award in 2013 and was Chevy Green Educator of the year in 2012.
SESSION 3A: It Takes a Village to Raise an Environmental Steward
This presentation will discuss strategies for community engagement to promote sustainability. The art of engaging and inspiring people of all ages and backgrounds is just that, an art. An informed and engaged citizenry is key to long term sustainability. Fostering awareness and concern about environmental sustainability, conservation, and stewardship requires many experiences in a variety of settings. Creating a stewardship program that can offer these types of experiences for your audience requires diverse partnerships and funding. During this presentation, participants learn how to develop a program that engages different types of partners, many who may not seem so obvious. Strategies, tactics and tools will be shared to help you reach your audience. No matter the topic!
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John Barrie

Exec. Dir., The Appropriate Technology Collaborative
BIO: John Barrie is an award winning designer who works with the world's poor and teams of designers and volunteers to create affordable and sustainable opportunity. John has degrees in Mathematics and Architecture from the University of Michigan. He is the founder of The Appropriate Technology Collaborative, a non profit that works with student teams, designers and volunteers to create opportunity for the world's poorest people.
SESSION 4D: Bringing Light to Dark Places
We now have the capacity to affordably "Leap Frog" over the electric grid and provide sustainable clean solar power to the world's poorest people. 1.6 billion people live without the benefits of electricity in their homes. They rely on kerosene lamps and candles to see at night. Kerosene is expensive, toxic and dangerous. For less money we can sell people solar power alternatives that provide better light, eliminate pollution and provide jobs in the sustainable economy. People who purchase solar power are able to work at night making handicrafts to sell in the market. Their children can do their homework at night for the first time. We, The Appropriate Technology Collaborative, are providing more solar power and more features to more people every year. We can skip the electric grid and go straight to solar power the same way cell phones are commonly used in countries where there is no infrastructure for land lines. In the next few years 1.6 billion people will find a way to power their homes. They might purchase small diesel generators or they might purchase solar power. We need to work together with our clients to show solar is the best choice.
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Bob Chapman

Executive Director, WARM Training Center

BIO:  Bob has been involved in energy efficiency and sustainability for over 30 years.  Since 1996 he has been executive director of the Detroit based nonprofit WARM Training Center, whose mission is to promote the development of healthy, resource efficient homes and communities.  Bob has served on the Boards of The Heat and Warmth Fund (THAW), the Economic Justice Commission of the Episcopal Diocese, and the City of Detroit’s Green Task Force.  He is currently a member of the statewide Coalition To Keep Michigan and the Metro Detroit Green Skills Alliance.

SESSION 2D: Reclaimed Wood in Southeast Michigan: Turning Waste Into Opportunity
Exciting new sustainable wood products are developing right out of Michigan's most urban environments. Two young organizations, the Urbanwood Project and Reclaim Detroit, are working to salvage usable wood from local communities. In their efforts to find value in re-moved dying trees and abandoned homes, these groups are turning waste into opportunity.

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Mark Clevey, MPA

Manager, Renewable Energy, MEDC Mich. Energy Office
BIO: Mark H. Clevey, MPA, is the Manager for Renewable Energy Programs with the MEDC Michigan Energy Office. Mark has over 35 years of professional experience in renewable energy and energy efficiency. He was the project manager on the first utility interconnected solar PV system in the state and was a formal Intervenior, on behalf of PV, in the original PURPA hearings. He is a veteran of the U.S. Air Force and holds an MPA.
SESSION 3D: Michigan Solar Initiative
In FY 2012/13, the Michigan Energy Office embarked on a new Integrated Solar Energy Initiative designed to enhance Community Vitality and Business Investment in Michigan. The Initiative is focused on removing barriers that often make solar PV cost prohibitive. This effort primarily occurred through a series of grants with several key partners (GLREA, CEC, GLBRA, MiIPL etc.) and collaboration with a number of key organizations (Warm Training, Sierra Club, McNaughton-McKay Engin. Co.). The Initiative is providing a series of ready to adopt systems and tools for communities including a new Solar Zoning/Permitting Guidebook, Community Solar Guidebook, Aggregated Purchasing Models and other tools designed specifically to lower the installed cost/watt for solar PV in Michigan. This presentation will outline the MEO Solar Initiative and provide examples of the new systems and tools MEO has available for communities and other.
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Jacob Corvidae, LEED AP

Green Programs Manager, WARM Training Center
BIO: Jacob Corvidae wants to help you realize your vision for a better future. He uses sustainability as a tool for tackling economic development, community building, and improved quality of life. Jacob works at WARM Training Center, a 30 year old Detroit based nonprofit that creates opportunities to learn and practice the sustainable use of energy and resources. He is also the President of the Southeast Michigan Regional Energy Office which provides energy services to local governments.
SESSION 2A: Actioniirs - A Fun Way to Go Green
Come discover this exciting to new tool that makes it fun and easy to go green. It also will make it easier to manage and measure your community's efforts. Based on deep insights into human motivation, this innovative tool, developed here in Michigan, will take sustainability from a chore to a change. It also builds integrity as it helps people go from notion to action. Come find out how to introduce it to your community.
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Sam Flanery

Partner, Building Science Energy Services
BIO: Sam Flanery is Founding Partner of Building Science Energy Services (BSES): a powerhouse of energy efficiency training, consulting and implementation. They fuse their extensive industry expertise with a passion for innovative program design, comprehensive contractor services, cutting edge technology and world class training programs. The BSES team is dedicated to energy efficiency done smarter, not harder.
SESSION 4B: Impact and Trends of Energy Efficiency Programs
The focus on energy efficiency in recent years has created remarkable progress and engages everyone from legislators to utility companies, community leaders to each individual home-owner. On a national scale, new building codes and statewide energy standards are driving builders and consumers to make more conscious decisions about building materials and remodeling priorities. In Michigan, utility programs have partnered with non-profit organizations and community leaders to educate local residents on the benefits of energy efficiency for our homes, families, and communities. Due to the increase in energy efficiency resources and accessibility to things like energy rebates, financing, and other mechanisms, homeowners are not only experiencing energy savings and cost savings on their monthly utility bills, but they’re able to improve the health, safety, and comfort of their homes at the same time. Discover the industry trends, who is getting involved, and how you can become part of the new energy efficient economy.
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Patty Gillis

Executive Director, Voices for Earth Justice
BIO: Patty Gillis is co-founder and executive director of Voices for Earth Justice (VEJ), an interfaith network that promotes sustainability through spirituality, education, and action advocacy. VEJ works with local congregations and the general public on environmental health, energy, and gardening. Patty also teaches sociology parttime at Schoolcraft College.
SESSION 2C: Establishing Hope House in Detroit
The development process of a new community center, office, and gardens, by Voices for Earth Justice in Detroit will be discussed in this panel. The sustainable rehabilitation of the two conjoined buildings on five lots was an education in sustainability; and a vehicle for building comunity support for our values of preservation of historical beauty, conservation of resources, environmental justice, creation care, and community involvement. The purpose of the project is to establish a community center, office, gardens and communal presence in northwest Detroit, in a neighborhood called Brightmoor. Everything from acquiring the property, finding volunteers and financial resources, design, construction and future plans with volunteers will be discussed by panel members. There will be many pictures, a short video on the deconstruction of part of the facility, and plenty of time for interaction with workshop attendees. Architect Celeste Allen Novak, AIA, LEED AP and Executive Director Patty Gillis, of Voices for Earth Justice will share the process of establishing Hope House in northwest Detroit’s Brightmoor neighborhood.
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Stefan Graf, FIALD, LC, IES

Lighting Specialist, Illuminart
BIO: Stefan Graf FIALD is a career professional lighting practitioner and educator providing seminars to audiences worldwide. He is the recipient of over 52 International Lighting design awards, a Fellow of the International Association of Lighting Designers and has been an instructor of lighting design at LTU, CCS, U of D and U of M. His seminars receive high marks for the educational materials presented and are also entertaining.
SESSION 3B: Achieving Long Term Lighting Benefits
Today, a primary objectives for new lighting has been primarily energy savings. While energy reduction is an important benefit there are numerous other considerations in planning lighting that are often overlooked. This seminar will introduce to you the long term benefits and methods required for optimum lighting efficiency! There are applications for indoor, outdoor lighting, new construction and renovations. Lighting technologies considerations will be reviewed; LED, daylight harvesting and the benefits of conventional lighting systems. This is a non-technical presentation that will help inform users, installers, suppliers, specifiers, owners and facility managers.
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Dick Green, PE, CEM, LEED Green Associate

Facilities Specialist, O'Brien Construction Company
BIO: Dick Green has been involved with energy efficiency and conservation projects for forty years. He has conducted energy audits on over 100 million square feet of industrial, commercial, schools and municipal floor space. He has a BS degree in Electrical EngineerIng and an MBA. And is a Certified Energy Manager and a LEED Green Associate.
SESSION 1B: Maximize Energy Efficiency in Office Buildings
Presentation proposal for the LTU 2013 Sustainability Conference Maximizing Energy Efficiency in an Office Building The presentation includes discussion of the energy efficient building envelope, lighting, Heating Ventilation and Air Conditioning (HVAC) systems and alternative sources of energy such as geothermal and how each is essential to move toward a net zero energy building. Five elements are essential for energy efficiency: top management support, installation energy efficient systems, use of automated controls, regular maintenance and operation support. As new technology becomes available, systems become more efficient and implementation costs are reduced. A net zero energy building starts with a building that has well insulated and sealed floors, walls and roof along with energy efficient doors and windows. With an energy efficient building envelope smaller more energy efficient HVAC systems can be installed. They key is to right size the systems for the space. This in turn opens options for geo-thermal, solar hot water and photovoltaic energy sources. Automated controls for lighting and HVAC systems improve the building efficiency while maintaining occupant comfort. This presentation demonstrates how the whole building design must be considered in addition to individual systems considerations.
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Fay Hansen

Associate Professor, Oakland University
BIO: Dr. Fay Hansen is an Associate Professor of Biological Sciences. She founded the Oakland University Campus Student Organic Farm after receiving her Certificate in Organic Farming at Michigan State University. She is developing a comprehensive academic training program in sustainable food systems on campus. She frequently lectures and offers workshops in the community as well.
SESSION 1C: Strategies for Maximizing Productivity from Community Urban Gardens
Community gardens are increasingly viewed as a viable and necessary step toward ending urban food insecurity as well as improving the health of residents in every community. Many organizations, both public and private, are joining this movement by starting a community garden for the purpose of donating the produce to a service providing organization. Too often this type of community garden struggles and ultimately fails or produces a yield that is far lower than its inherent potential and/or the service providing organization is unable to make the best the produce. Oakland University’s Campus Student Organic Farm Program trains students in maximizing productivity and developing farm/garden plans for non-profits. The OU-CSOFP aims to place these students in a position in the community to enhance productivity throughout community gardens in the area. We review some of the tools and strategies that every community garden can readily adopt to make a greater dent in food insecurity and the steps that service providing organizations can take to make better use of the produce they may receive from community gardens or other donors. We will also describe interinstitutional collaborations that are enhancing local food systems in and around Pontiac.
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Lynn Henning

Water Sentinel, Sierra Club Michigan Chapter
BIO: Lynn Henning received the 2010 International Goldman Environmental Prize for her work tracking environmental abuses at factory farms around her family farm in southeast Michigan. Her research has alerted authorities about violations and built cases against big polluters. Since 2002, she has gathered evidence about factory farm pollution as a Sierra Club Water Sentinel. She was featured in O Magazine, the documentary Last Call at the Oasis and on HBO’s Real Time with Bill Maher.
SESSION 4C: Less=More: Restoring the Balance to Michigan's Farming Landscape
More Michiganders go out of their way to shop at farmers markets and places supporting sustainable farmers to ensure the meat, eggs and dairy they eat are healthy and humane. Yet their tax dollars go to polluting factory farms, giving them a huge, unfair advantage over the farmers they want to support. Factory farms threaten our environment, food system and public health. They confine thousands of animals in warehouses or open feedlots and annually generate millions of gallons of contaminant filled wastes, leading to water, land and air pollution and state and federal law violations. In Michigan, we use taxpayer money to prop up these polluters, making it difficult for sustainable farmers to compete. Less=More is a coalition that aims to even the playing field for sustainable livestock farms by tackling the unfair subsidy system. It recently released a report documenting the relationship between Michigan factory farm pollution and subsidies and is leading a grassroots movement calling for State Conservationist Garry Lee of the Natural Resources Conservation Service to reprioritize how taxpayer money is spent. Lynn Henning, Sierra Club’s award winning Water Sentinel, and Food & Water Watch's Tia Lebherz discuss the issue and how people can change the system in Michigan.
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David Konkle

Grant Director, Great Lakes Renewable Energy Association
BIO: David Konkle was the Energy Coordinator for Ann Arbor for 20 years where he led the city’s efforts to increase energy efficiency and utilize renewable energy. He is now the Energy Programs Director for the Ann Arbor DDA and serves on the Board of Directors of the Great Lakes Renewable Energy Association. He is the currently the Director of a grant funded project to educate about the potential of Community Solar in Michigan.
SESSION 3D: Community Solar in Michigan
The Great Lakes Renewable Energy Association will present the results of its Michigan Energy Office sponsored study on the Feasibility of Community Solar in Michigan. What is Community Solar and why are projects springing up all across the US. Who is doing what to implement Community Solar in Michigan now? What barriers need to be overcome to promote wider development of Community Solar in Michigan and what can we do about it now.
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Brett Little, LEED APH, GreenStar Professional, Living Building Ambassador

Exec. Director, Alliance for Environmental Sustainability
BIO: Graduate of the Aquinas College Sustainable Business Bachelors Program, Brett has been working with AES for 5 years. Brett is the Secretary of the Lansing Passive House Alliance, USGBCWM Board member and a Living Building Ambassador. Brett owns Michigan's first GreenStar Certified Remodeled home that reduced energy use by 50%. Brett loves supporting the local economy, kayaking, microbreweries, public transportation, board games and living the Grand Rapids Dream.
SESSION 3C: Introduction to the Living Building Challenge
"The Living Building Challenge defines the most advanced measure of sustainability in the built environment possible today and acts to diminish the gap between current limits and ideal solutions. This certification program covers all building at all scales and is a unified tool for transformative design, allowing us to envision a future that is Socially Just, Culturally Rich and Ecologically Restorative. Whether your project is a single building, a park, a college campus or even a complete neighborhood community, the Living Building Challenge provides a framework for design, construction and the symbiotic relationship between people and all aspects of the built environment." The Institute has provided a very informative and inspiring one hour PowerPoint for the volunteer presenters to use as an educational tool. To be clear, this is a volunteer effort so there is no charge for the program.
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Gwen Meyer

Garden Coordinator, Lafayette Greens: A Compuware Corporation Urban Garden
BIO: Gwen Meyer coordinates Compuware’s urban garden project, Lafayette Greens. She manages the garden in downtown Detroit. Garlic and kale and growing food in and for the community drive her daily work. She loves living in Detroit, keeping bees, preserving produce, and spending time outdoors.
SESSION 1C: Lafayette Greens: Urban Gardening in Detroit's Central Business District
Lafayette Greens, Compuware Corporation’s urban garden, rests in the heart of the central business district in downtown Detroit. As a non-traditional garden/park, I'd like to share about the site development of Lafayette Greens, the community engagement surrounding the space, and the idea of productive growing in a central business district.
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Celeste Novak, AIA, LEED AP

Designer, Hope House, Voices for Earth Justice
BIO: Celeste Allen Novak is the principal of her small Michigan architectural firm. She led many planning teams that have reviewed sustainable design opportunities for cities through the AIA’s National Sustainable Design Assessment Teams (SDAT) programs. Celeste is an adjunct professor at Lawrence Technological University teaching graduate studios in Sustainable Design and Environmental Issues. She recently taught Environmental Planning in Nanchang, China and will be participating as a guest faculty for Madonna University’s MOOC on sustainability.
SESSION 2C: Establishing Hope House in Detroit
The development process of a new community center, office, and gardens, by Voices for Earth Justice in Detroit will be discussed in this panel. The sustainable rehabilitation of the two conjoined buildings on five lots was an education in sustainability; and a vehicle for building community support for our values of preservation of historical beauty, conservation of resources, environmental justice, creation care, and community involvement. The purpose of the project is to establish a community center, office, gardens and communal presence in northwest Detroit, in a neighborhood called Brightmoor. Everything from acquiring the property, finding volunteers and financial resources, design, construction and future plans with volunteers will be discussed by panel members. There will be many pictures, a short video on the deconstruction of part of the facility, and plenty of time for interaction with workshop attendees. Architect Celeste Allen Novak, AIA, LEED AP and Executive Director Patty Gillis, of Voices for Earth Justice will share the process of establishing Hope House in northwest Detroit’s Brightmoor neighborhood.
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Kerrin O'Brien

Executive Director, Michigan Recycling Coalition
BIO: Kerrin O’Brien has worked with the Michigan Recycling Coalition in a variety of capacities since 1993. In addition to managing the organization, her interest lies in building consensus and movement around pro-recycling policies that work in both the public and private sector. As a nonprofit development specialist and facilitator, Kerrin has led many nonprofit organizations through strategic planning efforts. She holds a Social Science bachelor from MSU and has completed ICL’s Executive Director Development Program.
SESSION 1D: The Value of Recycling
A vibrant and sustainable economy is dependent upon a healthy, productive environment. The resources and services provided by our ecosystem are indispensable to economic activity. Consequently, economic activity that serves to extend the productive life of natural resources and minimizes the waste byproducts of the economy's productive activity must be cardinal element of any lasting economic system. Recycling is one of those elements. In this session, learn about the value of recycling to Michigan's economy and what's needed to meaningfully increase the recovery of waste for recycling.
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Anthony Offak, RA, LEED AP BD+C

USGBC Students National Chair - Region 7: IN, MI & OH, Center for Green Schools
BIO: Anthony, is a architect by day, volunteer for students and sustainable advocacy by night. Being involved with USGBC Students he has helped build student groups that produce positive sustainable impacts for their future careers, their campus and their local communities. He also uses his over 13 years worth of experience as an architect and with sustainability to help mentor and raise the bar so those leaving college are as knowledgeable as their new coworkers.
SESSION 1A: Sustainable Campus & Community Events by Student Organizations
Every year students leave college desiring to make a positive difference in the world. The core stems from their college life, the student organizations they are involved in, and the seemingly limitless energy and passion students have while in college. As we try to make this world more sustainable, we need to harness this energy students have to make positive sustainable impacts on their campus and in the local community. This makes those places a little more greener, give the students valuable leadership experience to be used for the rest of their future careers, and gain sustainable knowledge sooner than would occur normally in their career. Similar to technology like kids growing up with iPads, this can raise the sustainable knowledge bar to have those entering the professional world with more sustainable knowledge than many of their coworkers. We will look at some of the student organizations, how they are organized, their positives impacts and some of the issues they face. We will look at examples of how they have positively impacted their campus and communities, and we will look at how campus facility managers (and others), along with communities organizations can work with students to create larger impact events.
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Michael Paciero

Masters of Architectural Engineering Student, LTU
BIO: Mike Paciero is a Masters student in the Architectural Engineering Program at Lawrence Technological University. He is the Director of Operations for the student organization "Students Constructing a Sustainable Tomorrow" (SCST), the group behind the 2015 Solar Decathlon efforts. This student organization is comprised of about 20 students who are committed to designing and implementing student initiated projects to increase ecological mindfulness as well as induce positive, lasting change in their surrounding communities.
SESSION 1A: SolarDetroit - Going Beyond Net Zero
As we continue to face a growing energy demand, more and more people are looking toward energy efficient strategies to incorporate in their daily lives at home. One avenue that the U.S. Department of Energy is helping this movement is through the Solar Decathlon competition. This competition sponsored by the DOE challenges 20 university teams every two years to design and build a modular, solar powered, 1000 sq. ft. home. When competition time comes, these teams transport their homes to Irvine, California to compete in various contests against the other universities and display them to the public. For roughly 22 months, students from each team spend countless hours organizing, designing, constructing, and testing their home. Lawrence Technological University competed in this prestigious competition in 2007 and once again a team of students is working diligently to enter the school in the upcoming 2015 competition. They will tell their entry's story and how it is quickly growing from just a competition entry to a community awareness and partnership project within the city of Detroit. This is a student initiated project you won't want to miss!
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Jessica Simons

Coordinator, The Urbanwood Project
BIO: Jessica Simons coordinates the Urbanwood Project through Recycle Ann Arbor. She also works with the Southeast Michigan RC&D Council where she has man aged wood utilization programming since 2004. Jessica previously worked for the USDA Forest Service and the Nature Conservancy. She is Secretary/Trustee for the Great Lakes Forest Products Society and a member of the Forest Stewardship Council. Jessica has M.S. Natural Resources from University of Michigan and a B.A. in Biology from West Virginia University.
SESSION 2D: Reclaimed Wood in Southeast Michigan
Exciting new sustainable wood products are developing right out of Michigan's most urban environments. Two young organizations, the Urbanwood Project and Reclaim Detroit, are working to salvage usable wood from local communities. In their efforts to find value in removed dying trees and abandoned homes, these groups are turning waste into opportunity.
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Raman Singh

Masters of Architectural Engineering Student, LTU

BIO:  Raman Singh is an (almost)  life-long resident of Michigan.  A graduate of Wayne State University with an M.S. in Mechanical Engineering, Raman owns a small business in Plymouth, Michigan.  She serves on the Board of Trustees of Gurdwara Sahib Hidden Falls, a Sikh house of worship, and is active with numerous local, interfaith organizations, including the Interfaith Leadership Council, WISDOM,  World Sabbath, and Michigan Roundtable for Diversity and Inclusion, along with Michigan IPL.  She is also a regular panelist on the Public Television Program Interfaith Odyssey.

SESSION 4A: Ecology & Theology
In this panel, faith leaders from diverse traditions discuss how their faiths conceptualize the environment and issues of sustainability. Featuring panelists from the Sikh, Hindu and Islamic religions, the discussion offers perspectives that differ from the conventional, secular view of humans as masters of creation, emphasizing instead the interconnectedness and interdepend-ency of all living things (humans, animals and plants). This panel reminds us that the common ground we occupy in our shared desire to care for creation can also be a foundation for build-ing unity across faith groups.

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Alexis S. Blizmanm, J.D.

Legislative and Policy Director, Ecology Center

BIO: Ms. Blizman has been actively engaged in climate and energy work through coalitions such as Clean Ener-gy Now, Michigan Energy Michigan Jobs, and MI Air MI Health. Since the 2011 court decision that eliminated the Low Income Energy Efficiency Fund, Ms. Blizman has worked to educate legislators and advocate for rein-statement of energy efficiency investments as part of low-income bill payment assistance programs. She completed her undergraduate studies at Wayne State University and holds a J.D. from George Washington University Law School.


Session 2B: PACE: Financing Efficiency and Renewables for Businesses and Non-Profits
Property Assessed Clean Energy (PACE) is sweeping the nation, having been adopted by 31 states and the District of Columbia most recently Arkansas, Utah and Texas.  Michigan passed a PACE statute in December, 2010, opening the way for Michigan counties, cities and townships to create PACE programs.  PACE allows long term financing that can turn clean energy projects into cash flow positive propositions for business owners and non-profits.  In short, property owners pay nothing down, financing 100% of their clean energy project, and finance it for a term up to the useful life of the equipment installed (5-20 years) long enough so their payments are less than the money they gain from energy savings.  Energy contractors, property owners, lenders, local governments, and the environment all come out winners.  This session provides a "PACE 101" course for business owners, energy contractors, energy auditors, lenders, local government officials and anyone else interested in bringing many more clean energy projects to fruition.  We will answer the following questions: What is PACE?  What problem does it set out to solve?  How does it work?  Where does it stand in Michigan?  How can I get involved?
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Steve Bell

Technical Support Contractor, Lockheed Martin in Support of US EPA ENERGY STAR for Congregations

BIO:  Steve worked as a technical support contractor for EPA for the past 10 years.During that time, he has provided Portfolio Manager and energy benchmarking training, energy efficiency recommendations and walk-through audits, and has developed materials to help houses of worship improve their energy efficiency and save money.He has a Bachelor’s degree in Economics from Towson University and a Master’s Degree in Financial Economics from Virginia Tech.

Portfolio Manager Workshop: ENERGY STAR Portfolio Manager for Congregations
ENERGY STAR is committed to helping congregations reduce their energy use to not only save money for their missions, but also to reduce the amount of Greenhouse Gas emissions into our environment.The most important first step a congregation can take in reducing their energy use is to create a benchmark to understand their current usage.The second step is to look for low-cost/no-cost ways to reduce your energy usage, and then evaluate the impact that these changes have on your energy usage.To help you take the first step, ENERGY STAR has created Portfolio Manager, a free, simple, user-friendly tool to help you track your energy saving progress.In addition this tool gives you a 1-100 score, allowing you to see how your congregation “stacks-up” against others across the country.This presentation is designed to provide an overview of this tool, to show you how to create your own account, and to evaluate what the numbers mean to your congregation.
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Nathan Vader

LTU Architectural Engineering Student

BIO:  Nathan is a 3rd year architectural engineering student at Lawrence Technological University. He has been in involved in the Solar Decathlon initiative project since his freshmen year and is currently working on the 'Building Systems' team for the early stages of the project. He is mainly engaged with researching various mechanical systems that are to be implemented into the house design.

Session 1A:  SolarDetroit - Going Beyond Net Zero

As we continue to face a growing energy demand, more and more people are looking toward energy efficient strategies to incorporate in their daily lives at home. One avenue that the U.S. Department of Energy is helping this movement is through the Solar Decathlon competition. This competition sponsored by the DOE challenges 20 university teams every two years to design and build a modular, solar powered, 1000 sq. ft. home. When competition time comes, these teams transport their homes to Irvine, California to compete in various contests against the other universities and display them to the public. For roughly 22 months, students from each team spend countless hours organizing, designing, constructing, and testing their home. Lawrence Technological University competed in this prestigious competition in 2007 and once again a team of students is working diligently to enter the school in the upcoming 2015 competition. They will tell their entry's story and how it is quickly growing from just a competition entry to a community awareness and partnership project within the city of Detroit. This is a student initiated project you won't want to miss!

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Lauren Pedigo

Architecture Student, LTU
BIO: Lauren Pedigo is an undergraduate student in Ar-chitecture at Lawrence Technological University. She serves as President of the student organization “U.S. Green Building Council” (USGBC-LTU), a student group that promotes sustainable choices on campus and with-in the community.
SESSION 1A: Sustainable Campus & Community Events by Student Organizations
Every year students leave college desiring to make a positive difference in the world. The core stems from their college life, the student organizations they are involved in, and the seemingly limitless energy and passion students have while in college. As we try to make this world more sustainable, we need to harness this energy students have to make positive sustainable impacts on their campus and in the local community. This makes those places a little more greener, give the students valuable leadership experience to be used for the rest of their fu-ture careers, and gain sustainable knowledge sooner than would occur normally in their ca-reer. Similar to technology like kids growing up with iPads, this can raise the sustainable knowledge bar to have those entering the professional world with more sustainable knowledge than many of their co-workers. We will look at some of the student organizations, how they are organized, their positives impacts and some of the issues they face. We will look at examples of how they have positively impacted their campus and communities, and we will look at how campus facility managers (and others), along with communities organizations can work with students to create larger impact events.
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Sridar Sivaraman

Associate Partner, IBM Global Business Services
BIO: Sridar Sivaraman is a software executive who has worked in the U.S. for over 20 years. Sridar is actively involved in the practice, learning and spread of Hindu culture and religious activities through his association with Sri Venketeswara Temple in Novi and Chinmaya Mission in Ann Arbor. Sridar is intimately familiar with industry and business issues within the Energy & Utility, Retail, Distribution and Financial Services sectors through his professional consulting experience. Sridar earned his MBA from the Stephen M. Ross School of Business at University of Michigan.

SESSION 4A: Ecology & Theology
In this panel, faith leaders from diverse traditions discuss how their faiths conceptualize the environment and issues of sustainability. Featuring panelists from the Sikh, Hindu and Islamic religions, the discussion offers perspectives that differ from the conventional, secular view of humans as masters of creation, emphasizing instead the interconnectedness and interdepend-ency of all living things (humans, animals and plants). This panel reminds us that the common ground we occupy in our shared desire to care for creation can also be a foundation for build-ing unity across faith groups.
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