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Lawrence Tech to host two digital humanities events Sept. 26-27

Release Date: August 15, 2014

For the second year Lawrence Technological University will host two conferences on the use of digital technology in the humanities, Network Detroit: Digital Humanities Theory and Practice on Friday, Sept. 26, and THATCamp on Saturday, Sept. 27.

Digital technology has revolutionized scholarship and research in the humanities, and now mobile devices are changing the way future college students interact with literature at a very young age.

Network Detroit: Digital Humanities Theory and Practice highlights digital humanities projects in the region and involves undergraduates, graduate students and university faculty. Museum archivists, publishing executives, scholars and teachers will report on the state of digital humanities projects and practices in their fields.

For registration information and a full schedule of the conference once it is finalized, visit www.detroitdh.com. Follow the blog at http://detroitdh.org/

The College of Arts and Letters at Michigan State University and the Institute for the Humanities at the University of Michigan are among the sponsors for this year’s conference.

One of the most exciting panels last year featured Detroit museums discussing their current and future digital projects. One again the conference will feature representatives from the Detroit Institute of Arts, the Henry Ford, the Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History, and the Detroit Historical Society

The keynote speaker will be Steven Jones, a professor of English and co-director of the Center for Textual Studies and the Digital Humanities at Loyola University Chicago. His research interests include Romantic-period literature, textual studies, and the digital humanities.

In his most recent book, “The Emergence of the Digital Humanities” (2013), Jones wrote, “The past decade has seen a profound shift in our collective understanding of the digital network. What was once understood to be a transcendent virtual reality is now experienced as a ubiquitous grid of data that we move through and interact with every day, raising new questions about the social, locative, embodied, and object-oriented nature of our experience in the networked world.”

THATCamp stands for “The Humanities and Technology Camp,” and has been described as “an open, inexpensive meeting where humanists and technologists of all skill levels learn and build together in sessions proposed on the spot.”