harold hotelling memorial lecture series

Harold Hotelling Lecture Series


Harold Hotelling (1945 – 2009) joined Lawrence Tech as an associate professor of economics in 1989 and taught courses in business law, business ethics, constitutional law, urban social issues, and law and economics. His life was marked by an unwavering dedication to his family, his church, his students, and his profession. Everyone who knew him benefited from his keen intellect, tireless devotion, quick wit, and wonderful sense of humor. Hotelling’s contributions to Lawrence Tech will always be remembered, but more importantly, he will be remembered as a great person and a dear friend.

2013 LECTURE

Spurr

Dr. Stephen Josiah Spurr, JD, Professor and Chair
Department of Economics, Wayne State University  

Thursday, November 7 - 7:30pm
Mary E. Marburger Science and Engineering Auditorium (S100), Science Building
21000 W. 10 Mile Road, Southfield, MI

The Lecture -  The Fruits of Our Labor: Wages and Income Mobility in the U.S.

This year marks the fifth anniversary of the financial meltdown of the American economy. Recovery is slow, and there is increasing concern about inequality of incomes and wealth in the U.S. There are also questions about how married couples can juggle careers, housework, and childcare. How well are U.S. workers doing compared to the rest of the world? How does the growth of the U.S. economy compare with other countries? Are we still an
upwardly mobile society – a land of opportunity – or can you expect that your annual earnings will be largely determined by the earnings of your parents? As women across the world become more career-oriented, how does this affect the number of children they have and the division of household work? Prominent labor economist Stephen Spurr examines recent research on these topics.

Stephen J. Spurr is a professor of economics and chair of the Department of Economics in the College of Arts and Sciences at Wayne State University. He has a JD from the University of Michigan Law School and a PhD in economics from the University of Chicago. His primary research interests are in the areas of labor economics and the economic analysis of law. He has published a textbook on the economic analysis of law and articles on promotion and turnover, sports economics, the economics of the legal profession, alternative dispute resolution, organ transplantation, medical malpractice, criminal law, bankruptcy law, and capital punishment.


The Harold Hotelling Memorial Lecture Series was founded to honor an esteemed scholar and colleague. Harold Hotelling (1945 - 2009) joined Lawrence Tech as an associate professor of economics in 1989 and taught courses in business law, business ethics, constitutional law, urban social issues, and law and economics. His life was marked by an unwavering dedication to his family, his church, his students, and his profession. Everyone who knew him benefited from his keen intellect, tireless devotion, quick wit, and wonderful sense of humor. Hotelling's contributions to Lawrence Tech will always be remembered, but more importantly, he will be remembered as a great person and a dear friend. 

ABOUT

If you are interested in supporting future Harold Hotelling Memorial lectures, please contact Lawrence Tech’s Office of University Advancement at 248.204.2300 or email advancement@ltu.edu

About Lawrence Tech

Lawrence Technological University is a private, accredited university focused on providing superior education through cutting-edge technology, small class sizes, and innovative programs. Lawrence Tech offers more than 60 academic programs through the Colleges of Architecture and Design, Arts and Sciences, Engineering, and Management.

Nearly 5,000 students are enrolled in undergraduate, master's, and doctoral programs conveniently offered for full or part-time students, with day, evening, and weekend courses. Lawrence Tech's 125-acre wireless laptop campus offers a complete range of academic, residential, and recreational facilities.

Archive

Michael H. Belzer

Dr. Michael Belzer, Associate Professor of Economics
Wayne State University

Transforming the Detroit Region into a Transportation Hub 
Michael H. Belzer, Associate Professor, Economics, Wayne State University

It's no secret that the Detroit region needs a tune-up. Michael Belzer proposes a solution: take advantage of our proximity to Canada and access to North America's only two transcontinental railroads to create an inland port similar to Chicago. This "Great Lakes Global Freight Gateway" would concentrate intermodal freight transport assets and transform the area into one of America's pre-eminent transport centers, proving regional business with low-cost and quick access to global markets. 

While the value proposition for business is great, Belzer estimates it's even greater for the region: $11 billion annually in new economic activity, 150,000 new jobs, and more than $1.3 billion in taxes to reenergize state and manicipal governments. 

Michael H. Belzer is associate professor in the Department of Economics, College of Arts and Sciences, at Wayne State University. he also is associate director of the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation's Trucking Industry Program, which focuses on trucking industry operations, regulation, industrial organization, and industrial relations, and directs its Trucking Industry Benchmarking Program. Belzer chairs the Transportation Research Board Committee on Trucking Industry Research and is a member of the Freight Systems Executive Board, the Committee of Freight Economics and Regulation, and the Bus Safety Committtee. He holds the PhD from Cornell University and is the author of Sweatshops on Wheels: Winners and Losers in Trucking Deregulation.


Ballard

2011- Dr. Charles Ballard

Michigan’s manufacturing-based economy was a powerhouse in the middle of the 20th century. But manufacturing has accounted for a shrinking portion of the economy for half a century. As a result, while incomes in Michigan were above the national average throughout the 1950s, 1960s, and 1970s, they have fallen below the national average in most years since then. This is partly because Michigan lags behind the national average in many aspects of educational attainment. If Michigan is to realize its potential for a brighter economic future, it will need to increase the skills of its workforce. Professor Ballard discussed the policies that will help to achieve that brighter future.

   
miron_stanto

2010 - Dr. Miron Stano

After describing trends in U.S. health care spending and health outcomes, Miron Stano provides an overview of cost-utility analysis. To many health care analysts, cost-utility analysis provides the conceptual framework for allocating dollars to alternative treatments including preventive measures. Although our current health care delivery system contains significant barriers to increased acceptance and adoption of preventive care, some preventive measures are not cost-effective. This presentation will focused on the various issues that relate to these barriers, the role of cost-utility analysis in preventive care, and recommendations for improving the efficiency of our health care system. ...more